Castle of Trevarez: The Italian Garden

The castle of Trevarez near Chateauneuf du Faou in northern Brittany, France, is one of the last great castles built in France. Construction began in 1892 for a French politician and brought together all the faste and excess of the Belle Epoque, frescoes, carvings, marble, mosaics, ornate panels and fireplaces.

It is often referred to as the pink or red castle, because of the pink color it gets from the bricks used.  It was unfortunately bombed in the 1940s, and has not been occupied since, but it is being renovated by the government who purchased it in the 70s.

The gardens were neglected as well for many years and have been slowly brought back to their original glory, one area at a time. The grounds are extensive, with stables, a large wash house, theme gardens, formal gardens and much more.

In this post, I am featuring one of my favorites of the Trevarez gardens, the Italian garden. It features a pond and grotto, a row of unusual fountains, and a lawn all along the side with a small water canal leading to the stairs going to the Romantic Garden. The Italian Garden is just to the side of the castle.

DSC01748 DSC01746 DSC01745 DSC01744 DSC01742 DSC01741 DSC01740 DSC01738 DSC01737 DSC01734 DSC01733 DSC01731 DSC01730 DSC01755 DSC01754 DSC01753 DSC01752 DSC01751 DSC01750 DSC01749

 

Advertisements

Castle of Trevarez in France: The Japanese Gardens

The castle of Trevarez near Chateauneuf du Faou in northern Brittany, France, is one of the last great castles built in France. Construction began in 1892 for a French politician and brought together all the faste and excess of the Belle Epoque, frescoes, carvings, marble, mosaics, ornate panels and fireplaces.

It is often referred to as the pink or red castle, because of the pink color it gets from the bricks used.  It was unfortunately bombed in the 1940s, and has not been occupied since, but it is being renovated by the government who purchased it in the 70s.

The gardens were neglected as well for many years and have been slowly brought back to their original glory, one area at a time. The grounds are extensive, with stables, a large wash house, theme gardens, formal gardens and much more.

In this post, I am featuring the Japanese gardens.There were originally two Japanese gardens: a smaller one nearer the main entrance and a larger one at the other end of the domain on the other side of the castle, but this latter has yet to be redone the way it used to be and after many years of neglect very little is left of it and the woods have reclaimed most of it.

At the entrance of the Japanese garden is a small pavilion; note the intricate paving, the bamboo, and water feature.

DSC01550 DSC01551 DSC01552 DSC01548 DSC01549

Past the pavilion is the Japanese rock garden with plantings and rock river beds for the stream.

DSC01558 DSC01570 DSC01569 DSC01568 DSC01566 DSC01565 DSC01564 DSC01563 DSC01561 DSC01560DSC01572 DSC01579 DSC01577 DSC01576 DSC01575 DSC01574 DSC01573 DSC01580Finally , below are a few photos of what is left of the other Japanese garden.

DSC01788 DSC01787 DSC01786 DSC01785 DSC01793 DSC01792 DSC01791 DSC01790 DSC01789

 

 

Castle of Trevarez: Castle and Formal Gardens

The castle of Trevarez near Chateauneuf du Faou in northern Brittany, France, is one of the last great castles built in France. Construction began in 1892 for a French politician and brought together all the faste and excess of the Belle Epoque, frescoes, carvings, marble, mosaics, ornate panels and fireplaces.

It is often referred to as the pink or red castle, because of the pink color it gets from the bricks used.  It was unfortunately bombed in the 1940s, and has not been occupied since, but it is being renovated by the government who purchased it in the 70s.

The gardens were neglected as well for many years and have been slowly brought back to their original glory, one area at a time. The grounds are extensive, with stables, a large wash house, theme gardens, formal gardens and much more.

In this post, I am featuring the castle itself with the formal gardens in the front. The castle is sited so as to overlook the valley in the back and enjoy a stunning view of the gardens terraced below, including a large collection of azaleas and rhododendrons directly below which were unfortunately not in bloom at the time of my visit.

DSC01698 DSC01700 DSC01701 DSC01703

Formal gardens with sundial and birdcage in axis
Formal gardens with sundial and birdcage in axis

DSC01706 DSC01707 DSC01708 DSC01709 DSC01710

Front view of the castle
Front view of the castle

DSC01712 DSC01713 DSC01715 DSC01716 DSC01717

The azaleas and rhododendrons below
The azaleas and rhododendrons below

DSC01720 DSC01721 DSC01722 DSC01723 DSC01724 DSC01725 DSC01726 DSC01727 DSC01728

Ovelrooking the Italian garden to the side below
Ovelrooking the Italian garden to the side below
Alley of hydrangeas below
Alley of hydrangeas below

DSC01736 DSC01690 DSC01692 DSC01694

Quimper Park: A Public Garden by the Riverfront

In the heart of old Quimper, near the cathedral and along other historic buildings on the waterfront, this lovely park provides a pleasant promenade by the river. It is lined with a colorful mix of banana trees, grasses, perennials and shrubs, as well as very old wisteria growing over arbors.

The lushness of the perennial borders and the choice of foliage give it an almost tropical feel, while the upcycled barrels used as planters give it a more modern edge.

DSC00918 DSC00919 DSC00920 DSC00921 DSC00922 DSC00923 DSC00925 DSC00926 DSC00929 DSC00930 DSC00931 DSC00932 DSC00935 DSC00937 DSC00938 DSC00939 DSC00940 DSC00941 DSC00910 DSC00911 DSC00912 DSC00913 DSC00914 DSC00915 DSC00916

 

More Pebble Designs & Patio Flooring Ideas from the Courtyards of Spain

Beautiful patios can be found throughout Andalusia, influenced bytthe Moors that ruled in Southern Spain until a final defeat in 1492. Cordoba embraced this heritage in its patio tradition perhaps more than any other Spanish city and has been celebrating with its famous Patio Festival in May since 1933.

Found throughout the south of Spain is the use of intricate pebble designs not only in the patios and courtyards, but also in many public areas and city squares. I am featuring here some of the many designs I came across, in particular in Granada , Cordoba and Sevilla.

DSC09961DSC00623DSC00653DSC00685DSC00709DSC00711DSC00795DSC00864DSC00865DSC00866DSC00907DSC00969DSC01106DSC01107DSC01351DSC01352DSC01421DSC01607DSC09537DSC09538DSC09646DSC09656DSC09689DSC09692DSC09795DSC09796DSC09797

Maria Luisa Park in Sevilla: Fountain of the Frogs and Island of the Birds

Maria Luisa, Infanta of Spain (1832-1897) was the younger sister of Isabella II, queen of Spain. She married Antoine, Duke of Montpensier, youngest son of the French King Louis Philippe, and became Duchess of Montpensier.

Most of the grounds that form Maria Luisa Park today where originally part of the Palace of San Telmo and donated by Maria Luisa to the city in 1893 to be used as public gardens. The palace , a magnificent example of Spanish baroque architecture was rehabilitated and converted in the 1990s into the seat of the autonomous government of Andalusia. It stands today just outside Maria Luisa Park.

French urban planner and landscape designer Jean Claude Nicolas Forestier, who also created the Bagatelle Rose Garden and the Laribal Gardens in Barcelona, started work on the park in 1911. Also in preparation of the 1929 World’s Fair, architect Anibal Gonzales began work on the Plaza de Espana building and some of the pavilions.

Under Forestier, who had been heavily influenced by the gardens of Andalusia and Morocco, the Park became a Moorish inspired extravaganza of tiled fountains, ponds, arbors, pavillions and other structures, planted in a lush Mediterranean style with vines, bougainvilleas, roses, palms orange trees and flower beds.

I discovered Forestier’s work when in Barcelona, visiting the stunning terraced Laribal Gardens on the hill of Montjuic.  These gardens lead from fountains to gazebos to arbors to rose gardens to the top of the hill where you discover the sweeping views down the hill with water stairs inspired by the Alhambra leading back down. This element of surprise and wonder is one I have found in all of Forestier’s gardens, whether in Paris at Bagatelle, Morocco at the Jardins d’Essais or here.

This park being such an expansive and complex creation, I am featuring it through several posts.This one showcases the Fountain of the Frogs (34 on map) and the Island of the Birds (6, Island of the Ducks on the map).   The whimsical Fountain of the Frog has colorful Andalusian ceramic frogs surroundinga fountain, followed by a pond that leads the Garden of the Lions to the Isleta de los Patos, or Birds Island.  The island provides a sanctuary for the many birds inhabiting the park; its focal point is the Pavilion of King Alfonso XII, which dates back to the time it was part of the San Telmo Palace.

DSC01064

DSC01065

DSC01066


DSC01036 DSC01023 DSC01024 DSC01025 DSC01026 DSC01028 DSC01029 DSC01030

 

DSC01047 DSC01049 DSC01054 DSC01055 DSC01041 DSC01042 DSC01043 DSC01044 DSC01045 DSC01046

 

Patios and Courtyards of Cordoba, Spain

Beautiful patios can be found throughout Andalusia, influenced bytthe Moors that ruled in Southern Spain until a final defeat in 1492. Cordoba embraced this heritage in its patio tradition perhaps more than any other Spanish city and has been celebrating with its famous Patio Festival in May since 1933. Here are a few of the many patios to be found throughout Cordoba’s old town, showcasing the use of fountains and water features, pebble patio designs typical of the region, and of course great container gardening ideas..

The Archbishop’s Building:

DSC00215DSC00218 DSC00211 DSC00213

Hotel courtyards:

DSC00231 DSC00232 DSC00233 DSC00234 DSC00230

Private residences:

DSC00237 DSC00238
DSC00235

DSC00230

 

Cordoba’s film museum:

DSC00244 DSC00240 DSC00241 DSC00243

Renowned Caballo Rojo restaurant:

DSC00247 DSC00248 DSC00249 DSC00250

The University of Cordoba:

DSC00255 DSC00251 DSC00253 DSC00254

A Travel & Garden Blog

Ambling & Rambling

Scattered thoughts and general musings

digwithdorris.com

News from under the earth

The Frustrated Gardener

The life and loves of a time-poor plantsman

NavasolaNature

Nature needs Nurture

Ravenscourt Gardens

Learning life's lessons in the garden!

Garden Walk Garden Talk

The Greater Garden of Nature

Jean's Garden

Observations from a Maine gardener

Ramblin' through Dave's Garden

A Virginia garden through the seasons

The Patient Gardener

The love of gardening is a seed once sown that never dies - Gertrude Jekyll

Garden tourist

Exploring garden design culture (Italian & English)

Rambling in the Garden

.....and nurturing my soul

That Bloomin' Garden

Gardening is a way of life

Whats Blooming

Gardens & Events at Historic Rosedale

Sunshinebright

Looking for the rays of sunshine I know are out there.

Deere Diary...

the life and times of a garden-loving, baking-loving, cat-loving West Country redhead

My Botanical Garden

Tamara Jare contemporary painting blog

Travels with Mary

Storytelling Adventure

%d bloggers like this: