Tag Archives: gardening

Cordoba Botanical Gardens: Sustainable Gardening & the Kitchen Garden

The Botanical Gardens in Cordoba, Spain opened in 1887 and were designed for primarily educational and scientific purposes. They are laid out along a wide central alley leading on one side to the Collections, species native to Spain arranged in borders edges by low growing rosemary or hackberry, and on the other side the Agricultural School, featured in this post, with a large collection of citrus trees as well as an extensive vegetable and kitchen garden. In the center are greenhouses dedicated to species from the Canary Islands, Balearic Islands and Andalusia, as well as a lovely area dedicated to the Andalusian patio.

In the School of Agriculture, the emphasis is on sustainability and diversity, with sustainability and organic gardening on the forefront. Plants grown are those for human or animal consumption as well as any plants offering benefits or use to people. Many different methods of cultivation are used and in those collection one can observe the different cycless of plants through the seasons.

DSC00143 DSC00142 DSC00141 DSC00140 DSC00139 DSC00160 DSC00159 DSC00158 DSC00157

Citrus Medica
Citrus Medica

DSC00153 DSC00150 DSC00149 DSC00147 DSC00146 DSC00145 DSC00144

Cordoba Botanical Gardens: the Scientific Garden

The Botanical Gardens in Cordoba, Spain opened in 1887 and were designed for primarily educational and scientific purposes. They are laid out along a wide central alley leading on one side to the Collections, featured in this post, species native to Spain arranged in borders edges by low growing rosemary or hackberry, and on the other side the Agricultural School with a large collection of citrus trees as well as an extensive vegetable garden. In the center are greenhouses dedicated to species from the Canary Islands, Balearic Islands and Andalusia, as well as a lovely area dedicated to the Andalusian patio.

he Collections are arranged scientifically along a central alley, by species and variety. All the plants included in the collections are autochtone to Spain.

DSC00127 DSC00131 DSC00132 DSC00133 DSC00134 DSC00135 DSC00137 DSC00161 DSC00162 DSC00164 DSC00099 DSC00100 DSC00117 DSC00118 DSC00119 DSC00120 DSC00121 DSC00122 DSC00123 DSC00124

Abbaye of Daoulas in Brittany: Art in the Gardens

The romanesque style Abbaye of Daoulas in the Brittany region of France dates back to the 12th century. This site is of interest not only for the monastery itself but for a remarkable cloister unique in Brittany, large grounds with a pond, old washouse and integrating outdoor art exhibits, but also for its medicinal garden which has one of the largest collection of plants in Europe. I am writing about these in separate posts.

In this post, I am featuring the grounds and art exhibit.  The grounds of the abbaye form an unexpected background for large scale photos of  the Omi people by photographer Hans Sylvester. Showing people who are so strikingly different from us at first glance, he also captures a human commonality in everyday gestures and occupations.

DSC02336

DSC02200 DSC02201 DSC02203 DSC02204 DSC02205 DSC02335 DSC02160 DSC02161 DSC02163 DSC02164 DSC02168 DSC02171 DSC02172 DSC02174 DSC02177 DSC02195 DSC02197

 

Barcelona Ciutadella Park: Fountains, Gaudi and Gardens

The Ciutadella Park in Barcelona is the largest and oldest city park. It was established in the mid 19th century and was for a long the only substantial green space in the city with about 70 acres of paths, trails, a lake, and assorted statuary and buildings. It is home to the Parliament building, the Barcelona Zoo, and the Geological museum. It is perhaps most famous for the very large waterfall fountain designed by Fontsere in the 1880s when Gaudi was his student and is believed to have contributed to it. It was inaugurated for the Universal Exhibition.

DSC08101 DSC07989 DSC07991 DSC07994 DSC07995 DSC07997 DSC08002 DSC08003 DSC08005 DSC08008 DSC08013 DSC08016 DSC08018 DSC08020 DSC08021 DSC08024 DSC08028 DSC08034 DSC08044 DSC08045 DSC08048 DSC08075 DSC08077

Barcelona’s Archaeology Museum Garden

Montjuic is a majestic hill in Barcelona overlooking the port, west of the center. The entire hill is a series of parks, gardens, museums, and other monuments, as it was developed first for the 1929 International Exhibition held in Barcelona Spain, then again for the 1992 Olympics. It is home to the Olympic ring, Arata Izosaki’s sports palace, the Catalan Art museum, the Spanish village, the Barcelona Botanical Gardens, the Archaeology Museum, the Greek Theater, the Mies van der Rohe Pavillion, the Juan Miro Foundation, the Laribal Gardens, just to name a few.

The Archaeology Museum has small gardens laid out around a fountain. The arches and statuary in the back, and the tall cypresses give it the feel of an Italian garden.

DSC08478 DSC08479 DSC08480 DSC08481 DSC08482 DSC08484 DSC08485 DSC08487 DSC08468 DSC08469 DSC08470 DSC08471 DSC08472 DSC08473
DSC08475 DSC08476 DSC08477

 

Ploher’s Old Gothic Church Garden

In this small Brittany village, the gothic era church with its lacy steeple typical of this region of Brittany is decorated with colorful mixed borders, decorative grasses, hydrangea hedges, and seasonal containers boxes.

DSC02087 DSC02086 DSC02085 DSC02084 DSC02083 DSC02082 DSC02080 DSC02079 DSC02078 DSC02077 DSC02074 DSC02071 DSC02067 DSC02066 DSC02091 DSC02090 DSC02088

A Romantic Garden in Old Toledo at the School of Fine Arts

I have written other posts on the beautiful city of Toledo, and while it is full of monuments and old world architecture, there are few public green spaces as gardens are more often than not part of private buildings not open to the public. This romantic garden with a large bust of Don Quixote as its focal point belong to the School of Fine Arts. Even in the fall citrus and khaki trees and bursts of color. Note also the stunningly ornate glass and iron conservatory alongside the building.

DSC09480  vbnmvZ/kdAZQ`weT8IP\];PDSC09479 DSC09478 DSC09475 DSC09474 DSC09473 DSC09471 DSC09470 DSC09468 DSC09467 DSC09466 DSC09465 DSC09464 DSC09463 DSC09462 DSC09461 DSC09460 DSC09459 DSC09458

Prinicipe de Anglona: A Historic Garden in Old Madrid

Jardín del Príncipe de Anglona is a beautiful green space, gracing Madrid’s Plaza de la Paja. It is one of the few examples of aristocratic gardens of the eighteenth century still preserved in the capital.

Its history is linked to the Palacio del Príncipe de Anglona, an edifice erected around 1530 as the residence of Francisco de Vargas- Jardín del Príncipe de Anglona was laid out in the eighteenth century, along one side of the mansion. It was designed in neo-classical style by Nicolás Chalmandrier.

The garden is named for Pedro de Alcántara Téllez-Girón y Alfonso-Pimentel, prince of Anglona and marquez of Jabalquinto, who lived in the mansion in the nineteenth century.”  (From stay.com)

I visited this garden in the fall, and I can only image what a wonderful green oasis it must be in the heart of Madrid when the arbor and roses are in full bloom.

 

DSC08755 DSC08739 DSC08740 DSC08741 DSC08742 DSC08743 DSC08744 DSC08745 DSC08746 DSC08747 DSC08748 DSC08749 DSC08750 DSC08751 DSC08753 DSC08754

The Alcazaba Gardens: Alhambra’s Fortress in Granada, Spain

Granada, in southern Spain,  is of course most famous for the Alhambra and Generalife gardens.  The Alcazaba was built as a fortress and is the oldest part of the Alhambra. The gardens of the Alcazaba are small but offer sweeping views of the city, as well as fountains and other features typically found in Moorish style gardens.

DSC00427
View from the Alcazaba

DSC00426
The gate

DSC00425
The ornate fountain outside the walls

DSC00424
On the hill going up to the gate

DSC00429
Building foundations remaining in the Alcazaba

DSC00428The garden proper is called Jardin de los Adarves. It is a long and narrow garden on the side of the Alcazaba overlooking the city.

DSC00436 DSC00437 DSC00438 DSC00439 DSC00440 DSC00441 DSC00442 DSC00443 DSC00432 DSC00433 DSC00435



Pebble Designs & Patio Flooring Ideas from the Courtyards of Spain

Beautiful patios can be found throughout Andalusia, influenced bytthe Moors that ruled in Southern Spain until a final defeat in 1492. Cordoba embraced this heritage in its patio tradition perhaps more than any other Spanish city and has been celebrating with its famous Patio Festival in May since 1933.

Found throughout the south of Spain is the use of intricate pebble designs not only in the patios and courtyards, but also in many public areas and city squares. I am featuring here some of the many designs I came across in particular in Granada , Cordoba and Sevilla.

DSC00587 DSC00082 DSC00085 DSC00086 DSC00225 DSC00226 DSC00227 DSC00228 DSC00240 DSC00243 DSC00248 DSC00275 DSC00279 DSC00281 DSC00337 DSC00338 DSC00339 DSC00346 DSC00359 DSC00361 DSC00388 DSC00389 DSC00395 DSC00488 DSC00489 DSC00546 DSC00557